Tuesday, December 10, 2013

What I Learned @ teachSDA This Weekend


Have you heard of SAMR? 
"SAMR, a model designed to help educators integrate technology into teaching and learning, was developed by Dr. Ruben Puentedura, Ph.D.. The model aims to enable teachers to design, develop, and integrate digital learning experiences that utilize technology to transform learning experiences to lead to high levels of achievement for students." (Quote from: http://msad75summertechnologyinstitute.wordpress.com/beyond-substitution/) 

Join us @teachSDA  on twitter or at www.teachSDA.org to learn more!  Here's a link to an awesome resource about SAMR: http://www.schrockguide.net/samr.html

I had so many articles that I had to control myself and only list the best!  I wanted to say that this list was compiled over the last 4 days and I only spent about 2-3 minutes a day on twitter to find them!  There is so much information if you spend time cultivating your twitter feed.  You can learn how soon!  We hope to have the first lessons done for the Adventist Learning Community in 2014.

1. The Art of Teaching, or why the freedom to teach is so important.
They gave her a script! All I could do was shake my head. The pressure to perform on high stakes tests has gotten to the point that teachers are being given scripts to teach from. This is a travesty. As I thought about this I could only arrive at the conclusion that those who make these decisions simply do not understand teaching.
http://www.power-2-teach.blogspot.com/2013/12/the-art-of-teaching-or-why-freedom-to.html?m=1#.UqcElpgTPeg.twitter

2. So, the U.S. Is Terrible at International Tests: Who Cares?
Americans have been botching tests like the PISA for 50 years. It hasn't held back our economy yet.  Maybe the sky isn't falling?
http://www.theatlantic.com/business/archive/2013/12/so-the-us-is-terrible-at-international-tests-who-cares/281999/

3. John Kuhn: Our Kids -- Coddled or Confident?
Frank Bruni recently wrote an article for the New York Times in which he argued that American children are coddled. In related news, Frank Bruni apparently doesn't know any poor children.
http://mobile.edweek.org/c.jsp?DISPATCHED=true&cid=25983841&item=http%3A%2F%2Fblogs.edweek.org%2Fteachers%2Fliving-in-dialogue%2F2013%2F12%2Fjohn_kuhn_our_kids_--_coddled_.html

4. In Teaching Algebra, the Not-So-Secret Way to Students’ Hearts
Education researchers are beginning to validate what many teachers have long known — connecting learning to student interests helps the information stick.
http://blogs.kqed.org/mindshift/2013/12/to-learn-algebra-the-not-so-secret-way-to-students-hearts/

5. Reflection: An Essential Leadership Practice
“One of the greatest moments in anybody’s developing experience is when he no longer tries to hide from himself but determines to get acquainted with himself as he really is.” - Norman Vincent Peale
http://switchandshift.com/reflection-an-essential-leadership-practice?utm_source=feedly

6. 100 Ways to Let Kids Know You Care
Let’s not forget the real “common core” for each and every one of our children has always been comprised of four crucial factors: “Will I be safe? Will I feel valued? Will I belong? Will I be capable?”
http://micheleborba.com/blog/100-ways-to-let-kids-know-you-care/

7. 15+ Ways of Teaching Every Student to Code (Even Without a Computer)
According to Code.org, 90 percent of U.S. schools are not teaching any computer science. Eyebrows have been raised this year as the U.K. passed a plan to educate every child how to code.
http://www.edutopia.org/blog/15-ways-teaching-students-coding-vicki-davis?utm_source=twitter&utm_medium=post&utm_campaign=blog-teaching-students-code-list-2

8. Common Core in Action: Writing for an Audience
What is new and different in the Common Core? When it comes to the writing standards, a heavy emphasis on audience for one thing, and this is very good news. The "audience" for student writing was once the lone teacher sitting after school with her cup of coffee, a red pen, and a stack of essays or other writing projects. And sadly, she might have been the only one, besides the student writers, that ever read them!
http://www.edutopia.org/blog/common-core-in-action-writing-for-audience-rebecca-alber?utm_source=facebook&utm_medium=post&utm_campaign=blog-writing-6-examples-repost-dec

9. Instead of "I don't know..." (poster in a classroom at Grosse Ile Middle School)
https://twitter.com/MicheleCorbat/status/408364601655308288/photo/1

10. The Power of Introverts: An Essential Understanding for Teachers
About a year ago, I read Susan Cain's Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World that Can't Stop Talking. I wanted to tell everyone about this book right away, but I also wanted to let what I'd learned sink in. I wanted to sit alone with my new self-awareness, process my experience, and absorb the revelations I'd had -- all in true introverted fashion. See, as I'd read Cain's book, my predominant thoughts were, "She's describing me! I'm an introvert! And there's nothing wrong with that!" The margins of my copy are littered with stars, exclamation points, and scribbles that, as I look back, reflect my profound relief and gained understandings.
http://www.edutopia.org/blog/power-introverts-essential-understanding-teachers-elena-aguilar?utm_source=facebook&utm_medium=post&utm_campaign=blog-introverts-rabbit-image-question

11. You just have to see this paint!