Tuesday, November 19, 2013

What I Learned @ teachSDA This Weekend


Last nights topic was very interesting!  "Tweetin, textin, bloggin—Can social media be used to improve student writing?" General wisdom says that todays social media must be ruining students writing skills but this article begs to differer, How Digital Writing I Making Students Smarter. Checkout the archive later today at www.teachSDA.org or join the chat #teachSDA on twitter.

Todays list of articles runs the spectrum from how to use your iPad in class to the traits of resilient people. I hope you find a few that interest you!

1. THE PARADOXICAL TRAITS OF RESILIENT PEOPLE
RESILIENT PEOPLE DEVELOP A MENTAL CAPACITY THAT ALLOWS THEM TO ADAPT WITH EASE DURING ADVERSITY. LIKE BAMBOO, THEY BEND BUT RARELY BREAK. HOW RESILIENT ARE YOU?

2. 10 ways to be a great teacher...
Does it match what you're doing?  I know it can be a hard question, but can you really afford not to evaluate how you're doing?
http://www.justintarte.com/2012/02/10-ways-to-be-great-teacher.html

3. 9 Strategies for Motivating Students in Mathematics
Motivating students to be (enthusiastically) receptive is one of the most important aspects of mathematics instruction and a critical aspect of the Common Core State Standards. Effective teachers should focus attention on the less interested students as well as the motivated ones.

4. Why Academic Teaching Doesn’t Help Kids Excel In Life
Academics. Most of our current school system revolves around it, and yet, I think it falls miserably short of what our kids need. To be honest, I think our academic system of education is highly overrated, at best. At worst, it destroys a number of our kids.
http://blogs.kqed.org/mindshift/2013/11/why-academic-teaching-doesnt-help-kids-excel-in-life/

5. The Digital Library of America
Did you know that this even excited!?  I didn't until this weekend...The vision of a national digital library has been circulating among librarians, scholars, educators, and private industry representatives since the early 1990s. Efforts led by a range of organizations, including the Library of Congress, HathiTrust, and the Internet Archive, have successfully built resources that provide books, images, historic records, and audiovisual materials to anyone with Internet access.
http://dp.la

6. 8 iPad Camera Integration Ideas for 1:1 Classrooms
So you've had your iPad for a while how have you been using it in the classroom?  Here are some ideas.

7. The Wall Machine
Have your kids create a fake Facebook wall about a historical event or figure.

8. Finland Eyes Programming Classes for Elementary School Students
Are you ready to teach programing instead of computers?  Maybe you should start. Elementary school students in Finland could be adding coding and programming to their nightly homework routine in the near future.

9. Understanding the Cognitive Demands of Poverty on our Students
New Jersey shoppers and Indian sugarcane farmers might have something to teach us about poverty and cognitive load. An article in the August issue of the magazine Science examined the possibilities of a causal effect between considerations of poverty and study participants' abilities to perform cognitively-demanding tasks.

10. Counseling Is a Virtual Experience for Students at Online Schools
Kim Rogusky spends her days helping high school seniors plan for life after graduation, responding to teens' occasional crises, and plowing through endless administrative tasks—the typical work of a school guidance counselor.
But Ms. Rogusky, who works for the 8,000-studentCommonwealth Connections Academy, the third-largest full-time online school in Pennsylvania, does nearly all of her work in cyberspace, interacting with students across the state primarily from her small cubicle in an office building in Harrisburg.

11. Rethinking Professional Learning and Technology: 8 Ideas for Teachers and Leaders
We all know the feeling. It’s Wednesday afternoon! (Or Wednesday planning period.) Time to drop grading the mountain of papers on your desk, to stop planning inspiring lessons, and put off talking with parents so that you may attend your school’s weekly, required dose of unhelpful professional development.
(hmmm, staff development every Wednesday?)